The Saving Elephants Blog

Featuring original content on classical conservatism, current affairs, and everything in-between, these weekly blog posts will illustrate how the wisdom of the past can be applied to the challenges of today.  The blog is organized by the following categories: Conservative Values (taking a deep dive into specific conservative ideas), Competing Worldviews (comparing and contrasting conservatism with other worldviews), Trumpism (posts related to the Trump phenomenon), Elections (observations on upcoming and past elections), and Cornucopia (posts that don't fit in the previous categories).

Select a category from the menu, or read the most recent weekly post below:

The Annica Thomas Show

My hard drive crashed, so there'll be no regular Friday post this week. However, I did appear as a guest on The Annica Thomas Show on Tulsa's local talk radio station 1170 KFAQ to talk about my blog, conservatism, and how it relates to a broader Biblical Christian worldview. You can catch that interview here. Until next week, Josh

We the People—Part 5 (The People and the Proletariat)

Original artwork by Marisa Draeger This series began by observing the absurdities of North Korea’s official website, which claims: “The Democratic People's Republic of Korea is a genuine workers' state in which all the people are completely liberated from exploitation and oppression. The workers, peasants, soldiers and intellectuals are the true masters of their destiny and are in a unique position to defend their interests.” We have come full circle. In the prior post we explored the traditional conservative/Madisonian response to the question of how best to secure the liberties of “the people” in a civil society. In short, James Madison viewed “the people” as various factions and advocated

We the People—Part 4 (Freedom and Factions)

Original artwork by Marisa Draeger Politicians are fond of talking about “the people.” In Part 1 of this series I ended with two questions that must be answered before we can reasonably expect politicians to address the needs of “the people”: Namely, who, exactly, are “the people” (Part 2)? And who speaks on their behalf (Part 3)? Having addressed those questions in prior posts, we’re now in a better position to examine what system(s) of government best protect the rights and advances the interests of “the people.” This is precisely the question James Madison—Founding Father, America’s fourth president, Father of the Constitution, and among the esteemed authors of the Federalist Papers—endea

We the People—Part 3 (Who Speaks for “The People?”)

Original artwork by Marisa Draeger We the People—Part 3 (Who Speaks for “The People?”) Politicians are fond of talking about “the people.” In Part 1 of this series I ended with two questions that must be answered before we can reasonably expect politicians to address the needs of “the people”: Namely, who, exactly, are “the people”? And who speaks on their behalf? I attempted to answer that first question in Part 2. Now we’ll explore the second. One ought to be suspect of any political system which defines who speaks on behalf of “the people” either too narrowly or too broadly. Circumstance coupled with prudence dictates whether the polling of the majority, or the voice of the perceived “lea